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20131207
20131207
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Search Results 0 to 33 of about 34 (some duplicates have been removed)
, their jobs, their civil rights and civil liberties -- someone who believes we can breakthrough the stalemate and suspicion that grip us in our policies abroad, if that is what they mean by liberal, then i'm proud to say i'm a liberal. as andrew and stephen write in their introduction to their father's letters, arthur schlessinger jr. helped kennedy craft those words. the letters, which are a marvelous book, chronicles the late historian's views really from world war for through the -- world war ii through the second iraq war. you can read letters from adelaide stevenson, john kennedy, robert kennedy, henry kissinger, william f. buckley jr., al gore, gore vidal, jacqueline kennedy and naturally -- given arthur's interest in american history -- groucho marx, sammy davis jr. and bianca jagger. alexandra, arthur's wife, is not here, so we can mention that one. to a detractor who accused arthur of being a communist sympathizer, he wrote: the facts i have cited should relieve your mind. if not, i can only commend you to the nearest sigh psychiatris. [laughter] i should note quickly that arthur had
, entertainment industry, but a and the civil-rights movement conspired to put a transparent the innocent man in prison -- present for the rest of his life. i had to ask myself why? and what i have chosen to do is to ask for basic questions why did this happen in? the second question is how transparent was george zimmerman innocent? how did these forces succeed to bring zimmerman to a trial and get him arrested? and fourth, what was the consequence of trying an innocent man and a county where he could expect a fair trial? let me start with the wise and i have to go back to the year 1920. the rest of to an italian-american gentleman arrested for the murder of a payroll clerk also an italian-american. they went to trial 1921 he was sentenced 15 years in prison nobody said anything about it that later they went to trial and had an interpreter and due process and went through the trial both were convicted in both transparently guilty. and in 19211 of the reporters the guys in this case throwback to his editor and said not much here. just a couple of logs in the jam then the aclu picks up the case
politics and the american civil rights movement. in south africisa the majority the population is black and hert white. he wanted to know how did a minority end up achieving civilh rights. he's fasecinated with the founding fathers. it's something mandela also does. but also, citizenship. the whole idea that you have rights in the united states.uth remember, blacks in south africa had none of that. so we were inspiring to nelson t mandela. >> i'm certain of that. was there anything that really surprised you? i'm sure you prepare add head of time and researched him and gota to know the man through what you were able to read and hear through other personal ane anecdotes. >> i said you are a beacon to the world in terms of the sacrifice and 27 years in jail. standing up for principal: he started laughing. i was taken aback. i thought he's not understanding this american guy, you know? but he said no.wa it's when he was growing up all he wanted to do was rebel against his parents. hewa wanted to get out of the b tribal situation. he was like a prince and go to the big city of johannesburg.
'm chewing earlier by neil bar but a civil rights attorney. i first asked him whether it's mandatory for all police departments across the country to train the police force on how to respond to the mentally ill the country. each apartment from his own rules and regulations songs. at this point were they all have such regulations. it is clear that each and every of our show and sadly for standpoint that it's essential that people who may have mental illness when they saw her mental illness or to temporarily as it should rest assured that they have the opportunity to come with an encounter with police as a way. equally important offices themselves because they are properly trained are they going to miss a test of a situation in and also sells and officers armed with a star. officers who are exposed to that knowledge what does that training will apply to look like or what might you think that it would look like and would use a credit way. the train i should deal with the ball with the understanding that generally times on your side and also the fact that the goalkicking to de escalate situation
of his skin was the main driver for nelson mandela as it was for civil rights leader here in the united states. there is a join and conjunction there. i think people in this country as dr. hill points out, had a special afint afinty for nelson mandela. >> you saw that, dr. hill, first hand. your organization transafrica played a pivotal role in the anti-apartheid movement. was mande mandela here in greatt to say "thank you" to the united states? >> yes he was here to say, "thank you" he had a very important agenda to present himself and the african national congress as kind of a political configuration that could assume state power and lead the nation through the non-apartheid era. that was a very important aspect to his visit. equally as important, however, was to have the kind of public support for mr. mandela and the organization and the public content and to have that public support that would out weigh the notion that they were. >> he himself said he didn't want to be known as a saint sai. if we go too far in bea beatifyg him that the message will be lost. we always have to be conc
mandela. how the son of another civil rights icon is help remembering a man who helped end apartheid. 'y and gifts store. anything we purchase for the paper cottage goes on our ink card. so you can manage your business expenses and access them online instantly with the game changing app from ink. we didn't get into business to spend time managing receipts, that's why we have ink. we like being in business because we like being creative, we like interacting with people. so you have time to focus on the things you love. ink from chase. so you can. [ mthat if you wear a partial,w you're almost twice as likely to lose your supporting teeth? try poligrip for partials. poligrip helps minimize stress which may damage supporting teeth by stabilizing your partial. care for your partial. help protect your natural teeth. >>> former presidents george w. bush and bill clinton will join president obama at a memorial for nelson mandela next week as south africa mourns its former president's death. crowds outside his johannesburg home are singing their tributes. ♪ hundreds of people of all ages and co
st century civil rights agenda with education, choice, voting rights, and prison reform as its foundation. no one's life should be ruined because of a youthful mistake. no one should be thrown in prison for years and decades when they haven't hurt anyone but themselves. no one should lose their voting rights because they spent time in prison. it does us no good to create jobs for young people in detroit if they can't later get such jobs because of an out-of-control war on drugs. mandatory minimum sentences that force judges to give 10, 20, sometimes 50 year sentences for drug offenses are crazy and they've got to end. it is a human tragedy. it is an idea of justice. and there need to be new voices from either party that will say it's time to change. this is whay i've joined with democrats on this. [applause] i've joined with democrats on this. i'm working with senator leahy from vermont to try to give junls more freedom, more leeway when it comes to sentencing. if it were your kid would you want to know whether it was their first crime? whether there's a chance to rehabilitate
, the '60s is a movement, the years of civil rights movement, the '80s, south africa, anti-apartheid activism, i think there was both but it was so riveting and real. even back to sharkville and the killing of 69 people, the kids in '76 in soweto. high school and elementary school children who are gunned down. it's tallas power of the images. you talked about nelson mandela. we did not see him for decades because they forbid his pic churs or voice from being heard. now we have the pictures from south africa. when you have children being gunned down, that is very hard to talk about. >> when we come back, what happened when ted cruz try day friday -- tried to remember nelson mandela this week. every day we're working to be an even better company - and to keep our commitments. and we've made a big commitment to america. bp supports nearly 250,000 jobs here. through all of our energy operations, we invest more in the u.s. than any other place in the world. in fact, we've invested over $55 billion here in the last five years - making bp america's largest energy investor. our com
on the things you love. ink from chase. so you can. >>> poet author and civil rights pioneer maya angelou needs little person son fied. she wrote and had a tribute to nelson mandela. the white house tweeted it out. here is an excerpt. >> his day is done, done. his wings came on a day reluctant to carry his burden. nelson mandela's day is done. no sun out lasts it's sunset but will raise again and bring the dawn. nelson mandela's day is done. we confess it in tearful voices, yet, we lift our own to say thank you, thank you our david, our great courageous man. we will not forget you. we will not dishonor you. we will remember and be glad that you lived among us, that you taught us, and that you loved us, all. >> i spoke with dr. maya angelou shortly before air time. dr. angelou, i watched the poem you wrote and recited and one of the things you struck me, you refer to him as david, not just south africa's david out our david, our david and our giddian. >> a man, a woman we can all be that particular person who has enough courage to stand up and say i am one. i have enough courage to dare to be a
civil disobedience. >> right, and i think the thing that's missing in a lot of this presentation, anderson, is that a lot of south africans died because of the resistant of the apartheid system to integration and liberation of africans in south africa. i think when we think about folks that lost their lives, it's a shameless act of the powers in south africa. one -- there were only 10% of the population but controlled 90% of the population. i think that it's important we talk about this fact, they were fighting a battle trying to end apartheid, trying to make sure everybody could be treated and nelson mandela was a symbol. he said i want everybody to come to the table, everybody to be a part of the new south of ka and everybody to vote. that's why he was elected not as the first african elected but the first democratically elected president of south africa. that's important. democracy and justice ask truth made a big difference. >> robin, i keep coming back to this and mentioned a couple times, i'm fascinated how he began to see himself and it was critical for him to see -- start
influenced civil rights leaders here and his complicated relationship with the united states. >>> also at this hour, on the record right now, president obama is wrapping up remarks about israel during a time of tension over iran. these are some live pictures. the president literally just wrapping up. more from the white house. >>> and the budget breakthrough, a rare bipartisan plan is in the works right now. i'll ask a gop congresswoman if they'll make deadline day. >>> there will be a lot of friendships made and other kids will have a friend to play with. >> and the buddy bench. one second-grader's idea to solve loneliness is today's big idea. a lot to get to. >>> we start this hour with the release of 85-year-old american veteran merrill newman. newman arrived at san francisco international airport about two hours ago to applause. he was holding his wife's hand. the north korean government released newman late last night. they'd been holding him in the country since october. as you might imagine, newman says he is thrilled to be home. >> it's been a great homecoming. and i'm tired bu
-in with congressman walter fauntroy and civil rights leader mary frances berry at the south african embassy in washington, d.c they told the ambassador that they would not leave until their demands were met. >> first was the immediate release of nelson mandela from prison. the second demand was that all of the black political prisoners be released. and thirdly that they begin immediately the dismantlement of the apartheid system. >> reporter: all three were jailed. that one act of civil disobedience led to a year of daily protests at the embassy where celebrities, members of congress, and citizens were also arrested. >> we put 5,000 people in jail at the embassy and that drove the headlines. >> free south africa! >> reporter: the movement pressured politicians to act. >> on this vote -- >> reporter: and in 1986 congress overroad president reagan's veto and imposed trade sanctions against south africa. u.s. businesses were forced to divest, costing the regime over $350 million that year alone. four years later, mandela was free. >> nelson mandela taking his first steps into a new south afric
is remembering nelson mandela. as plans for a memorial take shape the son of another civil rights icon is remembering the man who helped end apartheid. every day we're working to be an even better company - and to keep our commitments. and we've made a big commitment to america. bp supports nearly 250,000 jobs here. through all of our energy operations, we invest more in the u.s. than any other place in the world. in fact, we've invested over $55 billion here in the last five years - making bp america's largest energy investor. our commitment has never been stronger. i need you. i feel so alone. but you're not alone. i knew you'd come. like i could stay away. you know i can't do this without you. you'll never have to. you're always there for me. shh! i'll get you a rental car. i could also use an umbrella. fall in love with progressive's claims service. >>> plans for a week of mourning for nelson mandela are coming into focus. in johannesburg today hundreds of people are celebrating the life of the former south african president outside his home. mandela died thursday, he was 95 years
rights of all americans. in addition economic freedom, we have to have a 21st century civil rights agenda with education, choice, voting rights and prison reform. no one life should be ruined because of a youthful mistake. no one should be thrown in prison for years and decades when they haven't hurt anyone but themselves. no one should lose their voting rights because they spent time in prison. it does us no good to create jobs for young people in detroit if they can't later get such jobs because of out of control war on drugs. they should be able to vote and have a life and build a family. their children should look at what comes from happiness and hard work. we talk about the family unit owing down the drain, and we are preventing families from going back. we must address the federal mindset that values arrest rates. >> if it were your could, would there be a chance to be rehabilitating them. it is a health problem and will not get better in prison. would you want to know that there might be other solutions? they should get back into society. they should be able to get a job. they shou
nuclear negotiations and the syrian civil war. let's bring in washington right now. the president spoke about several issues to this group of israeli leaders and u.s. leaders. were they comfortable with his answers about iran and the recent deal to curtail iran's nuclear program? >> well, in some ways, fred, i think he said exactly what the audience wanted to hear in terms of the fact that no option is off the table. he said he wasn't sure if this agreement with iran was going to work, but if it didn't, he would still keep that military option on the take. but he also laid out some very strong red lines for a possible deal with iran. let's take a listen to what he had to say about the need for everyone to be realistic about what's possible. >> one can envision an ideal world in which iran said, we'll destroy every element and facility and you name it, it's all gone. i can envision a world in which congress passed every one of my bills that i put forward. i mean, there are a lot of things that i can envision that would be wonderful. but precisely because we don't trust the nature of the
of something the civil rights leader when he said we may have arrived on these shores in different ships, but we're all now.e same boat what's going on in this town is that too often, the two parties, you think they're from different countries. they view the other side as the nemy, not the fell blow citizens with whom they occasionally disagree. but in the long run, they have he sate fate, interests in common. we have to reconcile our differences, not accentuate them. but we forget we come from a common country and common a common nd for sure destiny. final thing i say, this is something that no labels is working to overcome. in this city today, what all of do every section is forge principle compromise, the word compromise, back in the dale, my father's time, that was statesmanship. today it's a act of betrayal. your don't work with party 100% of the time, you're ostracized, there's something wrong with you. you can see this on cable tv and a variety of other things. i'll finish by recounting words that lyndon johnson, a master legislator, said once. e grew up poor in the hill country
civil rights movement and then he was on the side of civil rights and then it got all complicated with affirmative action and bussing and sanctions he said made it all clear again. he stood up again against the president. i was covering the white house then and occasionally they would bring in small groups of reporters to chat with the president on the theor theory w each other. it was during this period the president said more black people drive and own cars in south africa than there are cars in the soviet union and to him that sort of rationalized, this was, you know, communism is the evil system. and you had po to do everything to stand up to communism. i remember clearly he reached for two cookies and said he had half a sandwich for lunch. pat buchanon was a speech writer in the white house then. i recalled this memory to him. he said he wrote that lean. he got it from commentary magazine. he said reagan loved it but the secretary of state george schultz was furious at him for putting it in. it made if president look like simpleton. >> but that was a part, anything that could
that there is true freedom in forgiveness. >>> joining me now, civil rights leader and president of the rainbow push coalition, reverend jesse jackson. awfully glad to speak with you. you listened to president clinton. do you agree he belongs in the statues of history with gandhi, martin luther king jr. if not maybe at the top of the list? >> external persecution and the wil will, dignity. they were driven by their suffering. you define them by what they did with the pain. that is to say when mr. mandela chose to use his pain for transformation. to use his pain for reconciliation, revenge or retaliation it took him to different level. >> what was it like to be in the same room as he was. oftentimes there are leaders -- and i will say this is applied to you as well. there are some people you think they take up all the energy because there's something about them. he must have had that as well. >> well, he did have a personal magnetism. i remember the first sunday he came out of jail in cape town at south africa at city hall. he walked in the room. having been in jail for 27 years, so aware and so aler
and bright to listen to both sides. it is right to be civil and right to care about what the other people have to say and that's a model that we desperately need today and that's another reason i wanted to write this book read. .. a couple more hours to go this afternoon, and now joining us here on our set in miami is jeremy scahill. here he is, his most recent book, "dirty wars: the world is a battlefield. " mr. scahill, earlier you were on a panel with dan balz and george packer, and one of the questioners asked you what do you see as the difference between how the bush administration and the obama administration approach the war on terror. >> right. , i mean, i think first of all it's great to be with you here on c-span and booktv. the bush with administration, i don't want to understate how atrocious i think that period was in american foreign policy. it really was like murder incorporated. the destruction of iraq, the creation of the cia black sites, the idea that the geneva convention was -- [inaudible] the abu ghraib torture, using guantanamo, you could go on and on in characterizi
if they were in politics they wanted to be friends with her. she was interested in civil rights as well. we had a problem with a white supremicist group and she helped a group lobby to get an vote tht brought an end to the white supreme group. she was encouraged to run for governor and had the name recognition and people behind her and an a lot of things politicians would want. but she chose not to. for several reasons and i talked about them in the book. but she wasn't one to say her own name. she preferred to work behind the scenes. she was one of the people that works in the senator, congress, and governor's office to get things done outside of the political fight. i came here to be the pastor of her church 20 years ago. i tell the most fun ster story of when she took the pastor out to get accounted she took me out for a burger and beer. she asked me what i wanted to know and who i wanted to know. i didn't know then who i was talking to because she never talked about herself. i found a story of a plane crash. she was at a meeting in sun valley and in charge of a lot of national people that w
but reunite once more as 50 red, white, and blue states. as the civil rights leader once reminded us -- "we may have arrived on these shores in different ships, but we are all in the same boat now." so, my friends, the time has come for the sons and daughters of lincoln and the heirs of jefferson and jackson to no longer wage war upon each other but to instead renew the struggle against the ancient enemies of man -- ignorance, poverty and disease. that is why we are here. that is why. >> he was so disgusted with washington. and, of course, he stayed. and there are all these examples of what he has gone on to do. so, look, it all speaks for itself. i mean, you can -- it's nice that there are commentators who can put a fine a point -- or a finer point on it. but this is all out there. >> chris dodd, former peace corps volunteer. >> chris dodd, very nice guy, very fun-loving guy. i mean, very sort of, you know, outspoken liberal. he was -- he had this great legislative last hurrah in 2010, where he -- you know, he coauthored dodd-frank. he was one of the chief engineers of the health care bill
in the civil rights movement the anti-apartheid movement was our opportunity to participate in that way. >> that's so true. we have to leave it there. congresswoman, safe travels. april, thank you for being with me. >> thank you. >>> when question come back, why is it acceptable for a 23-year-old offered $3 billion for an app but $3 billion seems like too much to keep a promise to workers who earned it? workers in an american city. that's coming up. turn to roc® retinol correxion®. one week, fine lines appear to fade. one month, deep wrinkles look smoother. after one year, skin looks ageless. high performance skincare™ only from roc®. take skincare to the next level with new roc® multi correxion® 5 in 1, proven to hydrate dryness, illuminate dullness, lift sagging, diminish the look of dark spots, and smooth the appearance of wrinkles. high performance skincare™ only from roc®. yes. cup your hands together for me. rub it all the way up your hands. any exposed skin. and get the backs of your hands too. put some just around your neck. [ bell rings ] you're good to go. okay great
>> a retired judge will lead an investigation into a suspected hate crime at san jose state university. civil rights advocate ladoris cordell will head an head an independent task force. members will look into what rules were broken and recommend changes to ensure student safety. four white students are accused of tormenting a black dorm-mate. >> some scary moments for shoppers. about 15 shoppers and workers were hurt when a car smashed into the trader joe's in oceanside, new york. police say an elderly woman lost control of her vehicle and went through the store windows. a witness decribed the >> it came right through the registers, it knocked over all of our registers that's the first thing i saw was the registers being backed up and one of my very close personal friends, i just grabbed her and pulled her out. >> now word on what caused the loss of vehicle control. 12 people were taken to the hosptial -- two of them seriously hurt. >> lane is approaching the bay area and we're even seen snow. here is looks from highway 24. the snow levels are bought 3,000 ft.. and no. we are seen snow down
holmes norton has her own memories of south africa's history. she was among four civil law right leaders who helped sparks months of demonstrations that helped bring about reform in south africa and freedom for trade unions there. she said it was time to celebrate his long and worthy life of making life better for many people. >> there's not a lot to mourn if you consider the life he lived and his gift to the world. we always mourn for the passing of one of the great men of our time. but in south africa, they're dancing. they are jubilant because their freedom is a straight line from his sacrifice. >>> the national museum of african art is another place to sign a condolence book for mandela. it will be available until next friday during regular visiting hours. you can also post messages on the website or facebook page. >>> metro is doing track work on all five rail lines this morning i. could put a wrench in your plans. in northern virginia, the arlington cemetery station is closed this weekend. you can take a free shuttle bus and you can only get to arlington cemetery on a bus leaving t
as lawyer, i've had to persuade civil rights groups to take particular positions when, for example, in new york city once an organization wanted to stop george lincoln rockwell, a terrible racist, from speaking in a park there, and i had a very difficult time persuading them that that's probably the -- trying to keep him from being licensed to speak is probably the best way to give him a big audience. why not just ignore him? and the same thing with books. you know, sometimes i know authors can't get any better advertisement than somebody trying to keep their books off the shelves. but when it does happen -- and it does happen frequently -- we're really talking about one of the most dangerous robs in our culture -- problems in our culture, and it is the stifling of ideas and taken to the extreme in nazi germany when they burn books, we see where that goes. so my excerpt isn't as delightful as the last one. it concerns the problems of war, and it comes from a book almost 100 years old about war, "all quiet on the western front." before going over to see -- [inaudible] we pack up his things.
. >> reporter: i want to get your thoughts as someone who has walked among civil rights giants and nelson mandela, and martin luther king. how aware were the two of them aware to their roles in the struggles? >> dr. king went to jail in '63 and so did nelson mandela. dr. king in his address referenced the struggle in south africa. the kinship from the american corporations and south africa and our government that was a part of it. also the things that we did here enabled mandela's freedom. for example, the '65 riots act that changed the course in this country. blacks could vote for the first time in the south and women could vote and you could vote on campuses and bilanguagebilangua. it clouded the sanctions on south africa led by congressman randell o. it seems to me our struggle and their struggle coincided very well. >> reporter: we appreciate your thoughts on this day, remembering nelson mandela. thank you. >> i'll see you before the week is over. >> reporter: all right. look forward to it. let's head back to new york now and erica. >> lester, thanks. >>> we want to turn to encour e
to mandela. from the politicians to musicians to the art is to the right is to civil servants around the world really there is no other figo on the planet. since the advent of mobile communications who can match that of the week we've seen the likes of mind that i think in a way maybe we went to like him again in the sense of unity. we have a universal appeal. the flight but just as the fight against oppression. he encapsulated it in a way that few could do because of school. he gave twenty seven years of his life in jail for this and that he was prepared to give his entire life for this he did it. i'm having done that uncommon and coming out the other end. he had a mole flower tea that none of this good match said in a slumping to be free to blog about the bomb them in the new post the black us president. but the fact that mandela gave up so much to get what he gallops and to achieve what he achieved. i don't think it's easy to be called in our lifetime and that's why we've had this incredible outpouring around the world stops me from the moment it has been an incredible outpouring
various black factions. and the white right wing goes to great lengths to disrupt the negotiations. >> mandela really believed the country was potentially on the brink of civil war. >> reporter: the violence peaks on easter sunday 1993 when a high-ranking anc member is shot outside his home by a white right-wing polish immigrant. >> there was uproar in the country. riots. >> reporter: the country finds itself in a moment of crisis. de klerk and the government are unable to keep the peace. there was only one man who could pull the nation back from the abyss. mandela addresses the country on national television. >> tonight why i'm reaching out to every single south african, black and white, now is the time for all south africans to stand together. >> only he could control the country in a crisis. and effectively, he was president from then on. de klerk was eclipsed. >> reporter: negotiations proceed, building towards a momentous event. >> the first time they were called for dignity was on the 7th of april, 1994. >> reporter: for the first time in its almost 400-year history, south af
or their legislatures judicial appointments and those kinds of things. we fought a civil war over this once before, you know, and i just don't think it is right. who --tion would be -- president obama when he severed -- when hed look for sat for 20 years and listen to reverend wright? guest: you know, i'm not quite sure how to answer that question. that there is a lot of variation between the states and the federal systems, and that is really one of the things that we found was that there is so much of a difference between a federal standards and the states, and the states really have so much variation between them. some of them -- the rules are state, soto the you have the separation of powers, you have the state rights. they would have a really unique form and unique standards. i could give examples of your interested. host: sure. guest: in new jersey, they asked the justices to discuss if they own any property in atlantic city. atlantic city geographically the tiny part of new jersey. i guess this came from interest in making sure there were not corruptive influences and gambling. in north carolina,
kinds of things. we fought a civil war over this once before, you know, and i just don't think it is right. who --tion would be -- president obama when he severed -- when hed look for sat for 20 years and listen to reverend wright? guest: you know, i'm not quite sure how to answer that question. that there is a lot of variation between the states and the federal systems, and that is really one of the things that we found was that there is so much of a difference between a federal standards and the states, and the states really have so much variation between them. some of them -- the rules are state, soto the you have the separation of powers, you have the state rights. they would have a really unique form and unique standards. i could give examples of your interested. host: sure. guest: in new jersey, they asked the justices to discuss if they own any property in atlantic city. atlantic city geographically the tiny part of new jersey. i guess this came from interest in making sure there were not corruptive influences and gambling. in north carolina, they asked for any -- if any
Search Results 0 to 33 of about 34 (some duplicates have been removed)